Job Interview:10 Most Common Questions Asked

What are the most common interview questions?

Wouldn’t it be great if you knew exactly what a hiring manager would be asking you in interview.wouldn’t in be great if you could get your job because you knew the kind of question the interviewer will ask you before giving you the job?While we unfortunately can’t read minds, we’ll give you the next best thing: a list of the 10 most commonly asked interview questions and answers. We do recommend spending some time getting comfortable with what you might be asked, what hiring managers are really looking for in your responses, and what it takes to show that you’re the right man or woman for the job.

Consider this list your interview question study guide.

1. “Tell me a little about yourself.” 

If you’re the interviewer, there’s a lot you should already know The candidate’s resume and cover letter should tell you plenty, and Facebook and Google can tell you more.

The goal of an interview is to determine whether the candidate will be outstanding in the job, and that means evaluating the skills and attitude required for that job. Does she need to be an empathetic leader? Ask about that. Does she need to take your company public? Ask about that.

If you’re the candidate, talk about why you took certain jobs. Explain why you left. Explain why you chose a certain school. Share why you decided to go to grad school. Discuss why you took a year off to backpack through Europe, and what you got out of the experience.

 

2. What is your greatest strength and weakness ?         

strength and weakness

Strength-When you are asked about your greatest strengths, it’s important to discuss the attributes that will qualify you for the specific job and set you apart from the other candidates.

Weakness- Do your best to frame your answers around positive aspects of your skills and abilities as an employee.

3. “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

5 years

Answers to this question go one of two basic ways. Candidates try to show their incredible ambition  by providing an extremely optimistic answer: “I want your job!” Or they try to show their humility by providing a meek, self-deprecating answer: “There are so many talented people here. I just want to do a great job and see where my talents take me.”

For interviewers, here’s a better question: “What business would you love to start?”

That question applies to any organization, because every employee at every company should have an entrepreneurial mind-set.The business a candidate would love to start tells you about her hopes and dreams, her interests and passions, the work she likes to do, the people she likes to work with … so just sit back and listen.

4. “Tell me about the toughest decision you had to make in the last six months.”

decision

The goal of this question is to evaluate the candidate’s reasoning ability, problem-solving skills, judgment, and possibly even willingness to take intelligent risks.

Having no answer is a definite warning sign. Everyone makes tough decisions, regardless of their position. My daughter worked part-time as a server at a local restaurant and made difficult decisions all the time — like the best way to deal with a regular customer whose behavior constituted borderline harassment.

A great answer proves you can make a difficult interpersonal decision, or better yet a difficult data-driven decision that includes interpersonal considerations and ramifications.

The best candidates naturally weigh all sides of an issue, not just the business or human side exclusively.

 

5. What is your greatest professional achievement?

acomplishment

Nothing says “hire me” better than a track record of achieving amazing results in past jobs, so don’t be shy when answering this interview question!  A great way to do so is by using the S-T-A-R method.

Set up the situation and the task that you were required to complete to provide the interviewer with background context, but spend the bulk of your time describing what you actually did (the action) and what you achieved.  For example, “

In one month, I streamlined the process, which saved my group 10 man-hours each month and reduced errors on invoices by 25%.”

6. “Tell me about a time you disagreed with a decision. What did you do?”               

disagree

No one agrees with every decision. Disagreements are fine; it’s what you do when you disagree that matters. (We all know people who love to have the “meeting after the meeting,” where they’ve supported a decision in the meeting but they then go out and undermine it.)

Show that you were professional. Show that you raised your concerns in a productive way. If you have an example that proves you can effect change, great — and if you don’t, show that you can support a decision even though you think it’s wrong.

Every company wants employees willing to be honest and forthright, to share concerns and issues … but to also get behind a decision and support it as if they agreed, even if they didn’t.

7. Tell me about a challenge or conflict you’ve faced at work, and how you dealt with it.

conflict

In asking this interview question, “your interviewer wants to get a sense of how you will respond to conflict. Again, you’ll want to use the S-T-A-R method, being sure to focus on how you handled the situation professionally and productively, and ideally closing with a happy ending, like how you came to a resolution or compromise.

8. “What do you expect me to accomplish in the first 90 days of your job?”

goal

If you weren’t asked this question, ask it yourself. Why? Great candidates want to hit the ground running. They don’t want to spend weeks or months “getting to know the organization.” They don’t want to spend huge chunks of time in orientation, in training, or in the futile pursuit of getting their feet wet.

They want to make a difference — and they want to make that difference right now.

9.What is your salary expectation from your job?

salary

This is one of the most troublesome questions for many interviewees. For some people, however, it causes no bother at all. It will depend on your personality as to how you feel talking about salary expectations. That said, there are some tips to help you deal with the question.

Firstly, it is okay to talk about pay in terms of ranges and not to be specific about a particular number. It is also okay to include other benefits, like healthcare, pensions and time off within the context of salary. Make sure you have looked at other, similar jobs being advertised in other organisations so that you have an idea of the pay rate in the market.

 

10. Is there anything that you would like to ask me?

ask me

Always have at least one question prepared in advance. This is your chance to drill down into an area of the business that might not have been covered in the interview. Alternatively, you may simply like to ask for feedback on how you have done in the interview.

A good tip is to pick up on something that has been mentioned in passing by the interviewer about the job. Ask him or her to expand on this. It should leave the interviewer with a good final impression of you.

These ten questions are certainly not the only ones that can be posed, but they are the most common ones. Remember that you don’t need to answer all questions at an interview if you feel they are too personal or you are not comfortable with them. Getting yourself prepared for common questions is necessary prep work before attending an interview.

Don’t make the answer come across as rehearsed; rather, just remember the gist of your answer and then let the sentences flow freely during the interview, which gives the interviewer a much better impression of you. Good luck!

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